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A group of Pentagon contractors has been awarded a $12.6 million contract to develop a cybersecurity-related cybersecurity program.

The Army National Guard Office of Inspector General (ANSIG) announced the award on Thursday to the Army’s Cybersecurity and Information Systems Center (CSIC), a cybersecurity unit based in the Fort Meade, Maryland, Army Base.

The project was awarded to a consortium of private contractors that includes Blue Coat Cybersecurity, Kaspersky Lab, and a small but growing group of firms based in Canada, Israel, India, Japan, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom.

The contract is part of the Pentagonwide initiative to improve the nation’s cyber defense, which is aimed at protecting the country’s critical infrastructure from cyber threats.

It will focus on cybersecurity training and mentorship for troops, as well as the recruitment and retention of cybersecurity personnel.

A spokesperson for the Army National Guards’ Cybersecurity Center, Maj. Joe Toth, said that the contract is the first of its kind awarded to CSIC in the Army.

“The work that they’re doing is really cutting edge and is going to help to protect the nation,” Toth said.

While the CSIC program is expected to help the Army achieve a “critical capability” of cyber security, Toth emphasized that the goal is to improve “the cybersecurity capabilities of the Army.””

The Army has a long history of cybersecurity training, mentorship, and work, and we’re really excited to partner with them.”

While the CSIC program is expected to help the Army achieve a “critical capability” of cyber security, Toth emphasized that the goal is to improve “the cybersecurity capabilities of the Army.”

The program will focus primarily on the creation of a cybersecurity curriculum that focuses on the use of threat models, the development of cybersecurity skills and processes, and skills in applying cybersecurity technology in real-world situations.

The program’s goal is also to help build “a cybersecurity infrastructure that can help improve and modernize the Army and its capabilities.”

A senior Army official said that CSIC has a goal to have 30 to 50 cybersecurity graduates in its ranks by 2025.

He added that the program is a continuation of a program that the Army began a decade ago and which was launched in 2010.

The official also noted that the training and curriculum developed under the contract will be integrated with a growing Army program called the Military Cybersecurity Academy.

This new effort, which will take a year or two to complete, will focus mainly on training the next-generation of cybersecurity professionals.

The academy will focus more on the Army-wide development of cyber capabilities and cybersecurity practices.